Territory is an interdisciplinary performance of dance, music and video that proposes a journey through the different conceptions of territory – private, interpersonal, social, political, acoustic and ethological.
Questions of identity are negotiated according to the relationship of the performers to their performance space, the territory they inhabit.
The territory of the performance is framed further by technology – surveillance cameras / monitors and sound equipment re-focus how the audience captures what ‘takes place’ onstage. Four infrared cameras are situated on different sides and levels of the stage. The cameras register constantly what is happening and their footage is shown on four monitors. The public is given the option to have a multiplied view of the performance - they have to negotiate between five angles of the same event, the live act onstage and what is shown on the monitors.
 
choreography Keren Levi
In collaboration with:
live music Tom Parkinson
media  Tamuz Binshtock
dance Jefta van Dinther, Matija Ferlin, Pedro Ines
light  Minna Tiikkainen
set Wover (Marieke Wouters and Florain Verheijen)
advice Ivana Müller
graphic design Miritte Ben Yitzchak / Cubicle-Design
produced by DWA in co-production with Grand Theatre Groningen
with the support of Monty Antwerp and PACT Zollverein Essen
funded by Amsterdamse Fonds voor de Kunst

1st Tour
18 nov 04 Grand Theatre Groningen
24 nov 04 Melkweg Amsterdam
25 nov 04 Melkweg Amsterdam
26 nov 04 Melkweg Amsterdam
04 dec 04 Korzo Den Haag
06 dec 06 Lantaren Rotterdam

2nd Tour / Serie Nieuwe Theatermakers / Theatre Institute NL
02 nov 05 Plaza Futura Eindhoven
03 nov 05 Lux Nijmegen
08 nov 05 Odeon Zwolle
11 nov 05 Lieve Vrouw Amersfoort
15 nov 05 Witte Theater IJmuiden
17 nov 05 Chassé Breda
21 nov 05 Bellevue Amsterdam
22 nov 05 Harmonie Leeuwarden
23 nov 05 Schouwburg Arnhem
25 nov 05 Almeerse Theaters Almere
26 nov 05 Kunstmin Dordrecht
30 nov 05 LAK Leiden




© cubical design
© cubical design
© tammuz binshtock
© tammuz binshtock
© tom parkinson
© joris-jan bos
© joris-jan bos
© joris-jan bos
© joris-jan bos
© joris-jan bos

Sun 23-11-2008 : the publicity material of The Prize Piece:


from the publicity material of The Prize Piece:

Keren Levi was honoured with the BNG Nieuwe Theatermakers Prijs 2006 (2006 New Theatre Director Award). The jury singled out Keren Levi and her show, Territory, as most promising amongst a distinguished group of directors and choreographers that took part in the 2005-2006 season of the Nieuwe Theater- makers series (currently known as Blind Date). “This show calls upon the audience to absorb, associate and interpret. The director has imbued this show, which addresses a very broad theme, with a number of surprising twists by combining a range of theatrical elements: music, movement and dance, video images and play. An intelligent show that provokes and lingers on well after the footlights have dimmed.” Levi used the prize money for the production The Prize Piece.article

Thu 27-07-2006 : Marking Territory, Keren Levi



Territory is an interdisciplinary performance of dance, music and video that proposes a journey through the different conceptions of territory – private, interpersonal, social, political, acoustic and ethological.

Questions of identity are negotiated according to the relationship of the performers (three male dancers and a musician) to their performance space, the territory they inhabit.

The territory of the performance is framed further by technology – surveillance cameras / monitors and sound equipment re-focus how the audience captures what ‘takes place’ onstage. Four infrared cameras are situated on different sides and levels of the stage. The cameras register constantly what is happening and their footage is shown on four monitors. The public is given the option to have a multiplied view of the performance - they have to negotiate between five angles of the same event, the live act onstage and what is shown on the monitors.

The sound provides a sixth ‘territory’ the noises produced in the theatre are recorded and fed back into the space on a loop - the footsteps and breath of the dancers and the laughs of the audience are dislocated from their initial performance. Over time the recognisable sounds – as they reverberate with the acoustic space of the theatre – become unintelligible tones. The feedback is interrupted at times by the impromptu formation of a band by the dancers or by bird song played from a vinyl record or a melancholy song.

The work is engaged with framing and occupation. Occupation of space, people and time (attention, air-time, etc.). Framing, in a sense of isolating, enclosing and cropping - actions that can also be read as territorial. In the piece the media is ‘framing the frame’- a frame as for a body, a structure, a place or a territory.

The territories of the cameras (what their lenses can capture) are virtual borders that enclose the movement of the dancers while the monitors (and their frames) functions as a place and as a territorial mark. Each monitor forms a micro-territory within the performance-space and every camera governs the space of the movement, they determine almost every action on stage.

In order to indicate which are the sections that are under surveillance, white lines mark the black dance floor, creating a web-like drawing. The cameras covering different sections of the performance space but they all join in one area that is in the territory of the top-angle camera. This territory, a rectangle of about 3m x 2m, is the main arena that encloses most of what is happening in the show.

Territory begins as an abstract and formal dance performance but as it evolves a theme emerges. The piece has been described as ‘schizophrenic’ because of this duality, it is unclear what codes should be applied in reading it. The background to the piece was One-Minute-Solo a collaboration between dance, music and film. We made a presentation that was structurally based on independent one-minute-solo-dance fragments that were inspired by different Haiku poems we worked with. But what we ended up with was a fragmented portrait of a woman - whilst concerned with the formal constraints imposed on us by the one-minute structure a narrative forced its way through.

We wanted to develop the solo further so from a pure compositional interest we thought about creating a quartet by male dancers that will utilise the solo dance and music material in a different arrangement and physical context. Conceptually the ‘fragmented portrait’ was meant to be developed into a portrait of a woman drawn by four men. A quote from Deleuze and Guattari - "A pack of freckles on a face, a pack of boys speaking through the voice of a woman, a clutch of girls, a horde of wolves in somebody's throat. We each go through so many bodies in each other." - gave inspiration during this part of the process.

Until we entered the studio in the end of September ’04 we spent about 6 months developing our ideas. During that period the piece didn’t have a name yet and the sense of it was as vague as my poor attempts to get to the bottom of Deleuze and Guattari’s texts which I was trying to read.

The concept of Territory made a big step forward thanks to the video concept. When Tammuz suggested to work with live cameras that will capture the show from different sides and will form four angled view of the live event, the piece came into being. The one which is four and the four that are one – that was the how the video dealt with the question of Multiplicity.


Meanwhile the question of the title of the piece left unanswered. We were under pressure from our producers to come out with a name for the early publicity material and the deadline was approaching. For Tom Territory was an obvious choice but I resisted it at first because it felt too bold. I was not ready yet for the challenge - the link between De-territorialization and my background was not tight enough in my perception. How strange to think about that in retrospective…

What finally made the click was our limited budget - the only cameras we could afford were security cameras. A financial limitation delivered me with a fresh insight and concluded the primary stage of the creation. The question of identity was no longer hidden in a formal compositional key but became grounded in my reality, my background and the situation in the country where I come from. As an Israeli, territory, surveillance, security and identity are a familiar cocktail. The term Territory has suggested a multifaceted web of meanings that spread out. At that point I was ready to take on broad the current political implications of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that this title suggested (especially in combination with my name), even though this was not my starting point. For me, this was a funny though organic process how all these ideas, limitations and factors evolved into a performance-concept that had social-political implications.

I often asked myself how could my work be engaged in issues that are outside Dance. So far in my work I was busy with choreography as such – I tried to make dance about dance because as a ‘young’ maker I had to understand my medium. I still do not understand how to work from an external concept because the process of realizing it in my medium is very difficult for me. Therefore I form my work by setting conditions - of the body, the space, the public. These conditions ‘tell’ me what the piece is about. It could come across as a random process and I still gather information how to engage with it as I go.

Territory is a piece that is questions its own identity. The conditions I have set there created a situation that enabled me to deal with these questions myself, questions that occupy my mind and trouble me in a private as well as communal contexts and to link them in the ongoing exploration of my work.

article
TERRITORY.mp4
Duration : 54:20
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